Sweet Wines vs Dry Wines – Which do you prefer?

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Everyone has a preference of what wine they prefer. Some enjoy the sweet and some enjoy the dry, while others just love them all. Wine is meant to be enjoyed, savouring every sip, while appreciating the company you are with and surrounding yourself with a calm, peaceful and relaxing environment.

Some wines may be marked as sweet or dry right on their labels, making this the easiest way to help determine the taste. However, most wines don’t, and understanding the difference between sweet wines vs dry wines can help you make the perfect wine selection.

 

What Makes A Sweet Wine?Sweet Wine

Sweet wines are aged longer and go through a special fermenting and harvesting process, resulting in a very unique sweet taste within the wine. Some favorite sweet wines include: Chablis, Rose’, Merlot, Sauvignon Blanc, Pinot Blanc, Zinfandel, Muscat, Lambrusco, Semillon, Chianti, Traminer, Chardonnay, Grenache, White Zinfandel, Vin Santo, Riesling, Verdelho, Chenin Blanc, Pinot Grigio, Marsanne, Scheurebe and White Burgandy.

How Are Dry Wines Produced?

Dry WineDry wines are not aged as long as sweet wines and they come in a variety of intensities, some can be strong and some soft. Some wines with a milder taste include Sauvingnon Blanc, Chablis, and Pinot Grigio. These wines have a very light intensity and just a hint of dryness. They are also the perfect ones to try when first introducing someone to dry wines.

Then again, you may want to indulge in a bottle of Merlot, Cabernet Sauvignon, Pinot Noir, Cabernet Franc, Sangiovese, Mirassou, Tempranillo, Yalumba, Veramonte, Syrah and Cousin Macul. These are medium and full bodied dry wines that are sure to peak your interest.

The Clues Are In The Labels

One of the easiest ways to tell if a wine is sweet or dry is by the alcohol content. When reading the label, if you find that the alcohol content is 11% or lower, the wine is more towards the sweet side. The higher the alcohol content, the dryer the wine will taste. This is a simple way of distinguishing the difference.

The sugar content is yet another key to telling the difference between sweet and dry wines. Dry wines have almost no sugar or maybe just a touch of sugar, while the sweet wines have a high percentage of sugar. Most sugar naturally occurs in the wine as it ages, but some vineyards and winemakers choose to add sugar to make their product unique and sweet.

Sweet Wine Label

When making your choice between sweet and dry wines, try to think which taste you are looking achieve. If you are trying to choose a wine to pair with a delicious dinner then you will want to consider what you will be serving.  Pairing a wine perfectly with a delicious meal or desert is one of the best ways to experience the flavor of the wine.

Wines can be a bit mysterious at times and you might get a pleasant surprise from what you were expecting. Sometimes you may be cautious and slowly sip a dry wine thinking it will be too powerful, but once you taste it, you find it to be absolutely amazing and it becomes your new favorite wine. There are times that you are expecting a sweet wine to be too sweet and find that it is the perfect option for a specific meal or desert that you are preparing.

 

Always keep in mind the basics of sweet wines and dry wines. Sweet wines taste sweet because all of its sugar is not converted into alcohol, this causes the wine to remain sweet.  Dry wine has a different fermentation process and the natural sugar that is in the grapes gets completely converted into alcohol, which is the natural process that creates a dry wine.

Now that you know the differences between sweet wines vs dry wines, you will be able to choose the perfect wine for every occasion. Learn to enjoy and savor every sip of wine, wether it be sweet or dry.

Sweet Wines vs Dry Wines


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